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Clos des Capucins

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The Clos des Capucins convent in Chinon was built in the early XVIIth century, mainly in response to the presence of the Protestants who had established themselves nearby in the town of Saumur. Their principal role was to convert the Protestants.

Jean Delahaye

Jean Delahaye

The Père Joseph (1577-1638) was handed the project of the construction of the Clos des Capucins in Chinon. He was appointed guardian of the convent in 1610.
The Père Jospeh was the confidant and advisor to the Cardinal de Richelieu, who himself , was the principal minister to Louis XIII. The Père Joseph was in effect the Minister of War under Louis XIII. He created a vast network of informers via the Capuchin monasteries and convents spread across the whole of Europe. He was obsessed with the idea of uniting Europe in a new crusade against the Turks. He never pulled it off.
The convent was completely destroyed during the French Revolution (1789-1799). However, the vineyard plots are the ones I am farming today, and the cellar in which the wine is currently aged in oak casks, no doubt dates back to the XVIIth century.

I have yet to find a sketch of the convent, but thanks to inventory of the buildings and furniture that dates back to 1790, we know there was a large dormitory and a number of bedrooms with a total of 30 beds, a church, chapels, a large refectory, cellars, wine presses, gardens, a vegetable garden and a stable.

The manor house on the property, with its unique view of the town of Chinon, the river Vienne and Castle of Chinon dates back to the 18th century. It was then modified in the 19th century.

Jean Delahaye

Jean Delahaye

 

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